home cooking

5 Questions: Tony Grossman

5 Questions: Tony Grossman

Meet Tony Grossman, seriously active dad to three animated, freckle-faced kids, and owner and beginner- farmer at Earnest Acres Farm in Wisconsin. He is the chief cook in the family, a sustainable-farming advocate, and as you’ll see, a prolific taco maker.

What does eating well look like for you?

Eating well, for me, would include: produce that is seasonal and locally-sourced as possible, meats that are not tainted with antibiotics, hormones, or torture/immoral living conditions, and grains that are whole and diverse. Eating well also mandates a comfortable space, shared with loved ones and anyone who is hungry. It demands calmness and gratitude towards those who sacrificed to either grow or be the food, and gratitude towards those who cook the food.

What is a favorite and reliable everyday dish for you and your family?

Breakfast Tacos. I lived in central Texas for 3 years of my life and can proudly say that for most of those mornings I had a breakfast taco. Why we bold northerners have not figured out that this is the most efficient and wholesome way to start a morning, I do not know. Tacos are easy to make, and can include almost anything from your fridge if paired and cooked right. Maybe I love them because I don’t like to follow recipes and you can wing tacos in every way; they are the easiest conduit for getting eggs and veggies into my children. Maybe I love them because other than coffee, nothing smells better than fried onions in the morning. I’m not sure, but my family always seems to be happy after a good breakfast taco.

Can you share a defining food memory?

Upon moving back to Minnesota I serendipitously landed a job at the Seward Co-op Grocery and Deli as a produce worker. I worked alongside intelligent lovers of food and sustainable farming practices, people striving to eat better and support a local food system. After three years I was totally and completely inspired to grow as much food as possible in as many places as possible. I was inspired to eat whole foods grown sustainably and to provide seasonally-appropriate meals (as often as possible anyway) to my children, no matter the cost to the food budget.    

What topics around food are you most interested in, and why?

I love to grow food. I love to experiment with growing food. So naturally any knowledge or information pertaining to this peaks my interest. One of my favorite things is to listen to older generations talk about the past, but growing food in particular is fascinating for me. Beyond this I am interested in advancing towards change in our food system. I believe that in some ways our country’s system of eating and distributing food has led us down a path of poor health. I believe we need to motivate future generations to learn how to grow their own food and to support a cooperative model of food sharing.

I have to ask. What would you hope for as a last meal on this earth?

For sure it would be a meal prepared by someone else. Food always tastes better to me whenever someone else cooks it. I would probably demand a full Indian-style buffet banquet with paneer in every dish.

Cupboard-Inspired

 
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A strong pantry is a sexy thing. Really, it says I’m ready to go and want for nothing. It says give me a few minutes, maybe a half hour, and I’ll make you something delicious. It says listen: I’m organized, resourceful, potentially frugal (if that sort of thing turns you on), and probably improvisational, which speaks to creativity and flexibility.

Maybe. At least that’s what I vibe when I see a well-armed cupboard, but that’s me. I believe that a strong pantry (and by pantry I mean something bigger such as cupboard, fridge, and freezer), with its ground cumin and smoked paprika, canned beans and bulk grains, and eggs and lemon for example, has the potential to see you through many scrappy (but satisfying) meals on its own. 

But there’s more. Not only is a strong pantry a self-sufficient thing, it allows us to enhance what else we bring into the house. A rotisserie chicken, for instance. Using our staples, let’s pair it with some rice. Or shred it into a chicken salad with olive oil, herbs and lemon. The carcass, along with stock vegetables, can gift us a pot of broth. Further, our pantry can extend what we already have, such as dull-looking leftovers reinvented with an over-easy egg on top and a drizzle of good olive oil. (We do this often enough in our house.)

With further zeal I'll say this: a strong pantry offers us a foundation. And foundation is what we need with any practice; we can always refer to it and use it to step forward. I have a built an entire page on the Basic Pantry and still believe in its magical powers. Visit that list, and see how your kitchen stacks up. Be imperfect about acquiring these things at first. Do what you can, gather some of them on sale, and others from a little spice shop you just happened into.

Want more? Register for my Cupboard-Inspired class at the Mississippi Market Natural Foods Co-op in St. Paul. We'll discuss the build of a strong pantry, how to make the most of it, and chatter about all its benefits.

Meal Planning with Chef Kristin: Cupboard-Inspired

$18-22
Tue, May 22, 2018
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM CDT

Mississippi Market- East 7th
740 East 7th
Saint Paul, Minnesota 55106

REGISTER HERE

5 Questions: Jeannie Farrell

 
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Do you know Jeannie, everyone knows Jeannie. In my neighborhood that is. A woman tuned in, she is the one who orchestrates the neighborhood meetings and potlucks; she is that soul. Earnest gardener and true home cook, Jeannie discusses how the kitchen is a venue for experimentation and learning; all the while with two small daughters and a rambunctious puppy at her busy heels.  

What does eating well look like for you?

When I am eating well, I am baking and making good food for my family.  A sweet potato, maple sausage and parmesan egg bake or blueberry muffins for breakfast.  Trying a new vegetarian recipe or going with the old standby of meat and potatoes for dinner.  Eating well for us is eating organic as much as possible and buying meat that is ethically raised – either from our local co-op or directly from the farmer at the downtown St. Paul farmers market.  

What is a favorite and reliable everyday dish for you and your family?

We love tacos! Recently I discovered a vegetarian taco meat made with baked quinoa – it is so delicious!  A homemade lentil soup with homemade bread always hits the spot for everyone on a cold winter day.

Can you share a defining food memory?

I was born in Melrose Park, Illinois, which at the time had a large Italian population. Most of my mother’s family (her parents were from Sicily) lived there or in the suburbs surrounding. Every summer we would drive to Melrose Park and go to Aunt Millie’s house for the Feast of Our Lady of Mount Carmel Church. There would be a procession honoring the Madonna in front of Aunt Mil’s house.  Inside her house I remember eating the best pizza! I recall it being cooked on a cookie sheet, so it was square and a bit salty (I am guessing anchovies) and did not have very much sauce, if any, on it. Oh, how good it was! After the parade we would walk to the carnival and eat Italian ice out of paper cups – as a little girl I looked forward to that Italian ice all day!  I also loved going to visit my grandma’s side of the family on Christmas Eve and eating cucidati (Italian fig cookies) and pizzelles.  My mom passed away when I was nine, but those fig and almond flavors always make my heart feel warm and connected to her and her family.

What topics around food are you most interested in, and why?

I was never allowed to help in the kitchen as a kid, so I never learned how to cook. I met my partner, a chef, when I was 24 years old. At the time, my specialty was making a poached egg – and that was about it.  Sean started helping me learn to cook and I am still amazed when I find things that I can do on my own or find a new way or process for making something in the kitchen.  Years ago, I was thrilled when I found out I could make my own yogurt.  Last year I took up kombucha and kvass making. I also love learning about how food can be used in the healing process. During flu season I make Elderberry syrup for my family and homemade fire tonic for Sean and I. it feels so good to take care of myself and my family in this simple way.

I have to ask. What would you hope for as a last meal on this earth?

Such a tough question! I am sure my answer would ebb and flow depending on the day, week, year. Currently, if I had to choose it would be good bread with olive oil and salt, cut up grapefruit, cashews, hard salami, a nice white cheddar, fig jam and crackers and chocolate cake with chocolate frosting and raspberries on top served on a lovely table with candles and fresh greenery or flowers.